Affichage de 15 résultats

Notice d'autorité
Bell, F.H., 1855-1940
Personne · 1855-1940

Francis Hugh Bell was born 6 August 1855 at Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he later became a barrister. He married M. Leila Steede (1862-1933) of Hamilton, Bermuda. They had at least two children, a daughter Barbara and a son, Hugh. Bell was a member of the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron and closely involved with the Marblehead to Halifax races. Frank H. Bell died in 1940.

Laleune, Mike
Personne

Mike Laleune was a director of the Paramount Theatre Society and was active in promoting the development of new theatres in the Halifax area for many years. Laleune earned a bachelor of Music from the University of Western Ontario and had been involved with numerous arts and theatre associations, such as the Nova Centre for the Performing Arts; Congrès Mondial Acadien 2004; Grou Tyme Acadien Festival; Atlantic Theatre Festival; Nova Scotia Kitchen Party; Nacel Inc.; East Coast Arts Productions; Symphony Nova Scotia; Ontario Arts Council; the Toronto Symphony Orchestra; and the Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal.

Fulton, Charles, 1896-1924
Personne

Charles Russell Fulton (1896-1924) was the first Halifax police officer to be killed on duty. He was shot by gang leader Lewis Bevis during the investigation of an armed robbery. He had been a police officer for four years and had been married to Ada Pearl Hartling for three years. His widow was responsible for forming this collection.

Mauger, Joshua 1725-1788
Personne

Joshua Mauger, (born in the parish of St John, Jersey 25 Apr 1725; died at Warborne, England 18 Oct 1788), was an influential figure in Halifax during the early years of the colony. In 1751 he became an agent victualler for the navy at Halifax. Based in England after 1760, he served as agent for the Nova Scotia Assembly at London, 1762-1768, and remained there until his death, serving as a Member of Parliament from 1768 until 1780. He kept his business and political interests in Nova Scotia while in London, as he was Halifax's largest ship owner, ship builder, brewer and distiller, and traded in lumber, fish and mercantile goods. He wielded a great deal of influence in Nova Scotia through his many associates in the colony, including businessmen John Butler (his attorney), Isaac Deschamps, and Nova Scotia Lt. Governor Michael Fracklin.

Longley, Charles F.
Personne · [1875] - 1945

Charles F. Longley operated a shipping company, C.F. Longley and Co. in Halifax. He served in South Africa in the 1890s. He purchased land around the Northwest Arm, including Deadman's Island in 1907 and Melville Cove are land ca. 1914. He was a principal in the Melville Park Company which initated an amusement park on Deadman's Island.

Lavers, Graham
Personne · 1942-

Graham Lavers was a freelance photographer and instructor of photography in Halifax. After graduating from Montreal's School of Modern Photography in 1962, he worked as a darkroom technician in John S. Holmes' Studio in Halifax. He was a cameraman for CJCH-TV and CBC-TV in Halifax, then started Photo 67 studio with partner Florian Kuchurean. Lavers taught photography at the Nova Scotia School of Art and Design, the Halifax Vocational School Extension department and at the YWCA-Halifax.

Graham Lavers was born in Halifax in 1942. His mother, Elizabeth Lavers taught at Southdale School in Dartmouth in the 1960s. His father, George ran a public relations firm "Commercial Promotions", and was hired by the Port of Halifax Club to organize their 1949 Exhibition.

Barkley, Jacqueline
Personne

Jackie Barkley was a social worker in Halifax who practiced, taught and wrote in areas such as child welfare, mental health, and adolescent counseling. She started out as a community organizer in the North End of Halifax, and assisted in the development of anti-poverty programs, welfare rights and tenants organizations.Ms. Barkley was an active member in many social justice organizations, most prominently:

  • the Metro Coalition for a Non Racist Society - an advocacy group of African Nova Scotian, Aboriginal and new Canadian communities who gave presentations on racism and white privilege, and published the book "Racism: Whose Problem?";

  • Nova Scotia Coalition Against the KKK, a grassroots multi-ethnic group that sprang up in the early 1980s to confront the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan in Canada;

  • the Social Policy Review Committee which was an umbrella group of Nova Scotia social workers, advocacy groups, labour and consumer groups;

  • the Municipal Action Committee which was active in the 1991 municipal elections promoting public participation and social justice issues.

    As a parent and resident of the North End, Barkley was also very involved with St. Joseph's A. McKay elementary school.

Her publications include chapters in Power and Resistance: Critical Thinking About Canadian Social Issues , Daily Meaning: Counternarratives of Teachers’ Work , and a commentary in the November 2009 issue of the “Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry”.

Mackintosh , James Crosskill
Personne · 1839 – 1924

James Crosskill Mackintosh was an alderman (1878-1884) and mayor of Halifax (1884-1887)and an active bank accountant, Presbyterian, and businessman.

Mackintosh was born on 1 February 1839 in Halifax, Nova Scotia the son of John and Mary Catherine (Crosskill) Mackintosh. J. C. Mackintosh's father had emigrated from Inverness, Scotland. Although a native Nova Scotian, his mother was also of Scottish descent, and Mackintosh had a strict Presbyterian upbringing, attending St John's School and the Free Church Academy. In later life he would devote much of his spare time to religious pursuits. He became first president of the Halifax Young Men's Christian Association as well as a member of the board of management of the Presbyterian College. In addition, he was one of the founders in 1871 of Fort Massey Presbyterian Church, where he served as elder and clerk of session among other responsibilities. After leaving school at 16, Mackintosh had joined the Bank of Nova Scotia as a senior clerk and begun his apprenticeship as an accountant. Two years later, in 1857, he in fact became the bank's official accountant – the first person to hold such a title in the organization. Mackintosh remained at the bank for the next 18 years, during which time he developed a reputation for superior workmanship. He married Emma Isabel Grant on 15 April 1869. In 1873 Mackintosh left the Bank of Nova Scotia to set up his own business with Mather Byles Almon. Initially, the firm seemed to do well but the partners soon split up, Almon going into life insurance and Mackintosh continuing the brokerage and banking business under the title of J. C. Mackintosh and Company. From its head office in Halifax, the firm eventually set up branches in Fredericton, Saint John, New Glasgow, N.S., and Montreal. In 1878 he was elected to Halifax City Council, and he remained an alderman until 1884 when he was elected mayor serving until 1887. During his three annual terms as mayor he spearheaded major public works projects including a dry dock and a regular ferry service between Dartmouth and Halifax. He died in Halifax on 8 May 1924.

Collins, Lou, 1922-2007
Personne · 1922-07-26 - 2007-09-01

Lou Collins was a prominent Halifax, Nova Scotia heritage activist, historian, educator and writer. Louis William Collins was born July 26, 1922 at home on Liverpool Street in Halifax. His parents were William Snowden Collins (1882-1965) and Amy Louisa (Higgins) Collins (1889-1975). Collins attended Chebucto Road School and Bloomfield High School, and later Dalhousie University where he earned a B.A. (1944) and M.A. (1945) in English and History, and a Diploma of Education (1946). On July 23, 1955, he married Pamela Betty Ventham and had three children with her: Margaret, Heather and Diane.

Collins began his long career in education in 1948, working first at King’s Collegiate School before moving into the Halifax public school system in 1950. Collins served as a teacher, administrator and/or principal at Richmond School Junior High, Westmount School, and Cornwallis Junior High before retiring in 1983. He continued to teach night classes for the Continuing Education Department and lecture on historical and architectural topics at local universities and institutions. In the course of his career as an educator, Collins was involved in several professional associations and unions, including being a founding member of the Nova Scotia Teachers’ Union and Nova Scotia Teachers’ Union Credit Union.Throughout much of his adult life, Collins was heavily involved in the Halifax and Nova Scotia heritage communities. In the 1960’s Collins began advocating for the preservation of numerous historic buildings in Halifax which were threatened by demolition under the new development practice of urban renewal. His efforts were pivotal in stopping the proposed Harbour Drive and preserving the Halifax waterfront area that became the Historic Properties development. Collins was chair of the City of Halifax’s Civic Advisory Committee on the Preservation of Historic Buildings and helped establish its successor, the Halifax Landmarks Commission, which he also chaired for a number of years. Later he was a member of the Heritage Advisory Committee and the Halifax Foundation. Collins’ extensive involvement in heritage societies and associations across the province included tenure as President of the Royal Nova Scotia Historical Society and membership on several boards including those of the Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia and the Public Archives of Nova Scotia. For his heritage preservation efforts, Collins received a number of awards, among them an honorary doctorate from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in 1979, the Heritage Canada Lieutenant-Governor's Gold Medal in 1981 (with his wife Pamela), and investiture in the Order of Canada in 1996.Collins was appointed Honorary Civic Historian for the City of Halifax from 1968-1996, and in this capacity was consulted by the Mayor and other city officials on various historical and heritage-related matters. Throughout his life Collins developed and delivered historical tours of Halifax, gave speeches and lectures at various events and functions, and worked as a research associate and historical consultant for local institutions. He was also active as a writer and journalist, producing a book, poems and many columns and articles for local newspapers and magazines. His wife Pam assisted Collins with his research and took many of the photographs he used to illustrate his lectures. In addition, Collins was active in the Boy Scouts of Canada for a number of years, and served as president of the Nova Scotia Camping Association and the Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Association of Nova Scotia. He died in Halifax on September 1, 2007.

Lloyd, John E. (John Edward), 1908-1985
Personne

John E. Lloyd was involved with Halifax City Council for nineteen years. Elected as an alderman for Ward 6 in 1937, he became mayor in 1943 but left to work for the UN in 1945. In 1946 he returned to local government and served as an alderman from 1946 thru 1949 and 1952 thru 1960, becoming mayor once again from 1960 thru 1963. He then moved on to federal politics.

A fuller biography is available at HRM Archives.