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Authority record

Wisdom, Jane B.

  • Person
  • 1884-1975

Jane Barnes Wisdom was a pioneer in the social welfare movement in Canada. She was born March 1, 1884 to Freeman W. and Mary Bell (McQueen) Wisdom in Saint John, New Brunswick, the third of four children. After graduating from McGill University with a Bachelor of Arts in 1907, she worked as ‘visitor on staff’ at the Charity Organization Society of Montreal while living in their University Settlement residence. In June 1910, she attended one of the first diploma courses in social work at the New York School of Philanthropy, an experimental training program affiliated with Columbia University. She returned to Montreal for a brief time, then took employment with the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities 1912-1916 as executive director of 2 districts. In July of 1916 she was recruited by the new Bureau of Social Services of Halifax (also known as the Halifax Welfare Bureau), to be their first permanent “General Secretary” (today’s equivalent of executive director) and served there until 1921. She survived the Halifax Explosion of Dec 6, 1917, and played an active role in the recovery efforts, being seconded to the Halifax Relief Commission as Supervisor of the Rehabilitation Department. In that role, she organized the building of Community Houses for survivors. In 1920 she worked on the Nova Scotia Provincial Commission researching and reporting on Mother’s Allowances, wages and working conditions of women in Nova Scotia factories. In the summer of that year she traveled around the British Isles (United Kingdom). In 1921 she returned to Montreal to earn a graduate degree from the Department of Economics at McGill University. While there, she was part time instructor of social case work in their Department of Social Science and School of Social Work, until 1924. From 1925 to 1939 she worked as executive director for the Women’s Directory of Montreal, a social services agency specializing in the care of single parent families. In 1941 she conducted a study of the social conditions in the coal mining town of Glace Bay, NS for the Canada Welfare Council, working with fellow social worker Charlotte Whitton (later mayor of Ottawa). She stayed in Glace Bay as the town’s first welfare officer and developed their program of social services, from 1941 until retirement in 1952. She retired to Sutherlands River, Pictou County and died June 9, 1975 at the age of 91.

Wiswall, John

  • Person
  • 1731-1821

Rev. John Wiswall was a Church of England clergyman, born in Boston in 1731. He died in 1821 at Wilmot, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia. He was married twice: first to Mercy Minot of Brunswick, Maine with whom he had four children, and secondly to Margaret Hutchinson of New Jersey. Wiswall was the minister at Falmouth in New England when the Revolutionary War began. As a Loyalist, he was forced to flee to Boston with his family and he lost his house and property. After a time as the minister for several churches in England and as a Chaplain aboard a British ship, he was sent by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel to Cornwallis Township, Nova Scotia in 1783. He served in this area until his death in 1821.

Wm. Stairs, Son & Morrow Limited

  • Corporate body
  • 1810-1975

William Stairs (1789-1865), general merchant, established his store in Halifax in 1810. By 1825 business had expanded and William re-located to the corner of George Street and Bedford Row. His son W.J. Stairs (1822-1906) became a partner in 1841 and the firm was named Wm. Stairs and Son, changing to Wm. Stairs and Sons three years later when William's other son John entered the partnership. Its name changed again to Wm. Stairs, Son and Morrow in 1854 when William's son-in-law Robert Morrow joined the firm. At the time of William's death in 1865 when W.J. succeeded him as head of the business, the firm had diversified its product line and branched into the shipping business. By 1880, the firm owned or managed thirty-two vessels. In 1869, the Dartmouth Rope Works factory was established as a branch plant and remained a wholly owned subsidiary until 1892. The firm was incorporated by an Act of the Legislature in 1900 but was liquidated in 1926 with a new company organized under the same corporate name. By 1970, Wm. Stairs, Son and Morrow, in addition to its subsidiaries and its wholesale hardware distributorship, consisted of four divisions and had branch offices in Sydney, N.S. and Moncton, N.B. The most lucrative component of the Stairs group was N.S. Tractors and Equipment, which continues to operate. The firm existed until 1975 when it merged with J.W. Bird and Co. of Fredericton. The former Stairs family firm survives under the name Bird-Stairs, a division of J.W. Bird and Company of Fredericton.

Wm. Stairs, Son & Morrow Limited

  • Corporate body
  • 1810-1975

William Stairs (1789-1865), general merchant, established his store in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1810. By 1825 business had expanded and William re-located to the corner of George Street and Bedford Row. His son W.J. Stairs (1822-1906) became a partner in 1841 and the firm was named Wm. Stairs and Son, changing to Wm. Stairs and Sons three years later when William's other son John entered the partnership. Its name changed again to Wm. Stairs, Son and Morrow in 1854 when William's son-in-law Robert Morrow joined the firm. At the time of William's death in 1865 when W.J. succeeded him as head of the business, the firm had diversified its product line and branched into the shipping business. By 1880, the firm owned or managed thirty-two vessels. In 1869, the Dartmouth Rope Works factory was established as a branch plant and remained a wholly owned subsidiary until 1892. The firm was incorporated by an Act of the Legislature in 1900 but was liquidated in 1926 with a new company organized under the same corporate name. By 1970, Wm. Stairs, Son and Morrow, in addition to its subsidiaries and its wholesale hardware distributorship, consisted of four divisions and had branch offices in Sydney, N.S. and Moncton, N.B. The most lucrative component of the Stairs group was N.S. Tractors and Equipment, which continues to operate. The firm existed until 1975 when it merged with J.W. Bird and Co. of Fredericton. The former Stairs family firm survives under the name Bird-Stairs, a division of J.W. Bird and Company of Fredericton.

Wm. Stairs, Son and Morrow Limited

  • Corporate body
  • 1810 - 1975

William Stairs first established a store in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1810. The business was renamed Wm. Stairs and Son in 1841 when Stairs' son, W. J., joined the business, and was renamed Wm. Stairs and Sons when Stairs' other son John joined as well in 1844. The business was renamed once again in 1854, when Stairs' son-in-law Robert Morrow became a partner and the business became known as Wm. Stairs, Son and Morrow. By 1865, William Stairs had passed away, W. J. Stairs had taken over his role, and the business had expanded into shipping. The Dartmouth Rope Works was established as a branch plant in 1869. Wm. Stairs, Son and Morrow was incorporated in 1900 but liquidated and reorganized in 1926. The business expanded to four divisions with offices in Sydney, Nova Scotia, and Moncton, New Brunswick. In 1975, the business merged with J.W. Bird and Co. in Fredericton, New Brunswick. N.S. Tractors and Equipment, a former branch of Wm. Stairs, Son and Morrow, still operates.

Wolfe, Augusta E., 1850-1939

  • Person
  • 1850-1939

Augusta E. Wolfe was born Augusta E. Croft on January 3, 1851 in West Dublin, Nova Scotia to farmers Fred and Margaret Croft. In 1886 she married Daniel Edgar Wolfe, a fisherman, with whom she had at least one son, Harold E. Wolfe, who died at sea. She died a widow on July 4, 1939.

Wolfville Meteorological Station

  • Corporate body
  • 1910-

The Wolfville Meteorological Station, run by the Canadian Government, began operating as early as 1910. Its original location is unknown, but in 1912 an observatory was built at Acadia University in the field behind Chipman House. The Meteorological Station may have operated from the Acadia Observatory. The Acadia Observatory was a two story building with a circular tower on the north-west side. From 1910/11 to 1935/36, Acadia offered courses in both Astronomy and Meteorology and used the Observatory for both. Meteorological instruments were located on the first floor of the building. It is uncertain how long the Meteorological Station operated, but the Acadia Observatory was torn down in the early 1960s, seemingly to make room for the new men's residence, Eaton House.

Women for Music Society

  • Corporate body
  • 1952-

The Women for Music Society dates back to 1952 when a group of women met in the home of Mrs. Angus L. Macdonald to establish an auxiliary for the Halifax Symphony Orchestra. The organization was originally called the Women's Auxiliary of the Atlantic Symphony Inc. However, in 1983 the name changed to the present Women for Music Society, with a mandate to support and promote live performances of music and to assist with the ongoing work of Symphony Nova Scotia.

Women in Media Foundation.

  • Corporate body

The Women in Media Foundation, originally called The Women’s Television Network Foundation, was formed in 1995 as part of the licenses agreement with the CRTC in launching the Women’s Television Network. Funded by the cable network, the foundation aimed to develop programs to assist women in areas of broadcasting where they are underrepresented, specifically technical operation positions.

Their Mission Statement and Core Principals were “At the WTN Foundation we inspire and educate Canadian women to participate and lead in the multi-media industry. In so doing we believe In diversity, equity, creative, excellence, integrity and learning.”

The foundation offered multiple programs and workshops to promote women in media and broadcast technology fields. The Girls TV Camp offered training for pre-teen and teenage girls as television technicians. The Women’s Technical Internship offered young women experience in hands on job skills in media and broadcasting technology and the Women’s Television Network dowment, was an educational fund to assist professional women in broadcasting and media to update their technology skills. Other programs and workshops included gender equity workshops, speaking engagements, creating lesson plans in video production for teachers and a girls travelling documentary team, taking girls to educational and technology courses across Canada.

In 2001 Corus Entertainment bought the Women’s Television Network, and moved all operations from Winnipeg, Manitoba to Toronto, Ontario. The media conglomerate planned on terminating the foundation. However, the foundation put forth a proposal to continue its funding by highlighting their accomplishments, their necessity, as well as the CRTC criteria in granting a license to the cable channel in 1995. Corus Entertainment agreed to continue funding the foundation until it wound down in 2008.

Women's Association

  • Corporate body

The Greenwich Women's Association Club was founded in 1933 at Kings County, Nova Scotia as an auxiliary body of the Greenwich United Church. The Club was founded to assist the local church and to engage in welfare work at home and church.

Results 4191 to 4200 of 4335