Showing 4163 results

Authority record

C.G. Lurcher (ship)

  • Corporate body
  • 1906-1969

A lightship was stationed at Lurcher Shoal, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, to assist in the safe guiding of passing vessels. A point of land did not exist to support a light house so a vessel with a light was moored near the shoal. The first lightship, Lurcher No. 14 began service circa 1906, commanded by Captain Fred Nickerson. In 1951 the first lightship was replaced by No. 2, commanded by Captain Leazon Maillet. Since that time vessels were repeatedly replaced: 1959, Lightship No. 2; 1960 Lightship No. 4 (launched originally as the Cartaraqui). In 1969 the last of the lightships at Lurcher Shoal, and the last in Canada, was retired. An automatic buoy replaced the vessel. Following the retirement of the last Lurcher the vessel was used for various Canadian Coast guard training and exercises. In 1995 the Canadian built vessel was sold to an American company.

Thomas Killam (Barque)

  • Corporate body
  • 1855-1866

The barque Thomas Killam was built at Yarmouth, N.S., in 1855 by Dennis Horton. It was owned by numerous local merchants, including John Killam Ryerson. Captains of the vessel included Amos Crosby and Henry Payne. The vessel was abandoned in the North Atlantic on 30 March 1866 on a voyage from Antwerp to New York with a cargo of sundries. During a bad storm the ship sprung a leak and the vessel began to take on water. The crew abandoned ship. All hands were saved, however the vessel was lost.

Trustees of School Section Number 32 in the Municipality of Yarmouth (North Kemptville, N.S.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1864-

Until 1864, students in the Kemptville region of Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia had received their entire education in one school. In that year, pursuant to the Education Act which laid the groundwork for Nova Scotia's free public school system, the area was divided into five school sections. One of the new sections thus created was based in the community of North Kempt, and was designated as School Section Number 32 in the District of Yarmouth (North Kempt became commonly known as North Kemptville during the early 1900s, a change reflected in the name of the school section). Each school section was responsible for establishing and maintaining a school house, the operation of which was to be overseen by a board of trustees, with the necessary funds being provided through compulsory assessment (taxation) of the school section's residents and provincial government grants. Trustees were elected for three year terms at annual meetings of a school section's ratepayers and were responsible for holding all school property, employing and maintaining teachers, making regular visits to the school, looking after school facilities and equipment, summoning regular meetings of the ratepayers of the school section, filing returns with the divisional inspector, making arrangements for the conveyance of pupils, and, in later years, enforcing the Public Health Act in schools. Not all sections built school houses or organized boards of trustees right away, however. It is uncertain when the North Kemptville school section opened its school house, but attendance registers dating back to 1888 have been found. Pursuant to the Education Act, the North Kemptville school section's board of trustees operated as a body corporate under the title "Trustees of School Section Number 32 in the District of Yarmouth". Following the establishment of municipal school boards, responsible for the financial administration of schools in rural municipalities, in the 1940s, the word "District" was replaced with "Municipality". This move to the "larger school unit" was a response to the difficulties which many rural school sections had encountered in meeting their operating costs. School sections retained responsibility for capital expenditures, but soaring public school enrolments in the 1950s, accompanied, paradoxically, by the continuation of the long, steady decline in the province's rural population, made Nova Scotia's costly profusion of small rural schools increasingly unattractive to the provincial government's Department of Education. Furthermore, the construction of better rural roads, which could be kept open throughout the winter, and the increased availability of reliable school buses made feasible the transportation of students to larger, centralized schools. These factors sealed the fate of most of Nova Scotia's small rural school houses, such as North Kemptville's, and of the sectional boards which had operated them. The local boards of trustees' powers were steadily eroded during the 1940s and 1950s as increased responsibilities were given to municipal school boards, and many small school houses closed as larger "consolidated," or "district" schools were opened. The North Kemptville school house remained in operation until 1958, when its students were transferred to the new Carleton Consolidated School. At the time of the North Kemptville school's closure, seventeen students from the elementary grades were being taught in its single classroom, although junior and senior high school students had also been in attendance as recently as the early 1950s. The board of trustees remained in operation until the time of the school's closure.

Trustees of School Section Number 3 in the Municipality of Yarmouth (Arcadia, N.S.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1864-

The first school house at Arcadia, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia was built in 1775. Upon the building of the Free Baptist Church in 1835, the old meeting house was taken over to be used as a school house. Another school house was eventually erected, but it was destroyed by fire and a new school building was constructed during the years 1860 to 1864. The completion of Arcadia's new school coincided with the introduction of a new provincial Education Act which laid the groundwork for Nova Scotia's free public school system and established the jurisidictions of Nova Scotia's Boards of School Commissioners. These jurisidictions, identified as school districts, were generally based on county boundaries. The school districts were, in turn, divided into school sections. The community of Arcadia was designated as School Section Number 3 in the District of Yarmouth. Each school section was responsible for establishing and maintaining a school house, the operation of which was to be overseen by a board of trustees, with the necessary funds being provided through compulsory assessment of the school section's residents and provincial government grants. Trustees were elected for three year terms and were responsible for holding all school property, employing and maintaining teachers, making regular visits to the school, looking after school facilities and equipment, summoning regular meetings of the ratepayers of the school section, filing returns with the divisional inspector, making arrangements for the conveyance of pupils, and enforcing the Public Health Act. Following the establishment of municipal school boards, the word "District" was replaced with "Municipality". This move to the "larger school unit" was a response to the difficulties which many rural school sections had encountered in meeting their operating costs however school sections retained responsibility for capital expenditures. During the 1940s and 1950s the local boards of trustees' powers steadily eroded as increased responsibilities were given to municipal school boards, and many small school houses closed as larger "consolidated," or "district" schools were opened. The Arcadia's village school house remained in operation until 1958, when its students were transferred to the new Arcadia Consolidated School.

Canada. Postmaster (Yarmouth, N.S.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1807-1954

The Yarmouth Postmaster was responsible for the smooth and efficient delivery of the mail in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. Yarmouth's first postmaster was Dr. Henry G. Farish who served in that position from 1807-1856. During much of Farish's tenure, Nova Scotia's mails were under the jurisdiction of Britain's Imperial Postmaster General, with provincial postal services being overseen by a Deputy Postmaster General. In 1851, however, responsibility for Nova Scotia's postal service passed to the provincial government, and a provincial Postmaster General was appointed. Under the terms of the 1867 British North America Act, Canada's new federal government assumed responsibility for all postal services in the Dominion. In April, 1868, the newly-created federal Post Office Department took over all postal operations across Canada. The post office in Yarmouth continued to operate under federal jurisdiction, with its postmasters being appointed by the Canadian government. In June 1954, the system in Yarmouth changed from a centralized post office with boxes for recipients, to free mail carrier service and mailbox pick up. Postmasters at the time of this change were C.P. Dunn, and Edward E. McBride.

United States. Consulate (Yarmouth, N.S.)

  • Corporate body

The United States Consulate in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia was the local representative of the U.S. government for that region. Duties of the officer in charge at the Consulate included maintaining a record of American citizens residing locally.

Lynch's Men's Wear (Yarmouth, Yarmouth County N.S.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1984-

Lynch's Men's Wear was a men's clothing store located at 340 Main Street, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. As well as carrying several lines of fine clothing, the store supplied uniforms to many local groups and businesses. The store was owned and founded by Samuel Lynch and later taken over by his son Hubert who was also involved in town politics. The business ceased operations circa 1984.

G.W. Wolff (ship)

  • Corporate body
  • 1878-

G.W. Wolff was an iron ship built at Belfast, Ireland in 1878 by the firm of Harland and Wolff, employed by S. Lawther. The vessel was considered to be one of the finest ships under British registry in its time. A series of masters commanded the ship: 1885 Captain Jago, 1892 J. Ellis, 1895-1905 Watson Butler, 1909/10 J. W. Thomas. Until the year 1910 the vessel was listed in Lloyd's Register of ships, however, by 1919, it was no longer recorded. The final fate of the vessel is unknown. Captain Watson Butler was born in Wellington, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia on 19 Jan. 1854, the son of Stephen Butler and Anna Baker (Watson). He first married Emma Porter, the daughter of Jacob B. Porter and Caroline Crosby, and secondly Beatrice Pitman the daughter of Captain Samuel Pitman of Brooklyn. Butler died 18 June 1936 and is buried in Hebron Cemetery. He was master of the G.W. Wolff for at least ten years.

Allen, Alvin James, 1906-1988

  • Person
  • 1906-1988

Alvin James Allen was born at Yarmouth, N.S. in 1906, the son of Charles and Sadie (nee Zwicker) Allen. He resided on Main Street, Yarmouth, joined the Merchant Marines in 1922, and earned his Master Mariner's papers in 1944. Allen died 12 April 1988 at Dartmouth.

Acadian Factory (Sainte Anne du Ruisseau, N.S.)

  • Corporate body

The Acadian Factory was a general wood working business located at Sainte-Anne-du-Ruisseau, Nova Scotia. It specialized in the fabrication of sashes, doors and windows, but also did minor carpentry work. The factory was established by Sylvain Pothier, who also worked as a shoemaker in the area. Locally, the factory was known as "La shop à Sylvain à Michel."

Results 51 to 60 of 4163