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Terra Nova
Item · 1600
Item is an early map of Eastern Canada. Bertius derived this map from Petrus Plancius' map of North America (1594), which documented Newfoundland as a single island for the first time. MAP 501
Item · 1633
Item is the first printed map to include an accurate depiction of Prince Edward Island, and the earliest depiction of a north-south orientated Lake Champlain. MAP 686
Book, Bible
Item · 1656
Bible with 3 individual pieces of paper (4 total components). 'a' is a wood, leather jacket with 7 brass corner pieces (1 is missing), 2 brass clasps, and 2 leather straps with brass hooks. Some writing on the inside top cover has a date (1675) and says it was published by the Brothers John & Henry Stern at Lunenburg (not Nova Scotia) in 1656. 'b' is a drawing with sketches of 2 bushes and a tree with some flowers on the upper left borders, done in black ink. 'c' is a hand written note in black ink describing the early data in the Bible's publication. 'd' is a letter written in German, dated 1797. 018.54
Item · July 19, 1684 – September 14, 1684
Item is a cartographic journal containing daily entries and twenty-five cartographic diagrams and topographical illustrations showing coastlines, elevations, distances (in leagues), water depths, capes, bays, rivers, inlets, islands and other geographical features. From the accounts of the first few days, the jump off point must have been somewhere near Mahone Bay or Lunenburg, on the southern coast of Nova Scotia. Few observations are recorded during the first week; the aim seems to have been to reach an initial destination of Grand Manan Island. At this point, beginning on July 25, 1684, detailed observations are made of all islands, rocks, and other geographical objects, along with more specific information concerning water depths (given in braces), types of currents, prevailing winds, distances between landmarks (given in leagues), places of secure anchorage, danger zones, etc. Most of the observed areas are accompanied by topographical illustrations which depict not only the contours of the coastline, but also elevations from sea level. The expedition proceeded from Grand Manan Island down into Passamaquoddy Bay (this is not named, but the St. Croix River is), then Northeast along the coast of New Brunswick to the entrance to the St. John River. At this point, the expedition encountered at least two British war vessels, equipped with cannons. An envoy from the expedition was sent to the British ships, apparently commanded by John Nelson, the nephew of the first proprietor of New Brunswick; assurances are exchanged, the envoy is returned, and the expedition again proceeds along its way. Much of this portion of the expedition was obscured by a dense and persistent thick fog which made the task of the cartographer at times impossible, as he frequently notes. From St. John River, the expedition turned back again across the Bay of Fundy, along Long Island, down along the Western coast of Nova Scotia to Cape Sable. This destination is reached by July 31, 1684, and here some days are passed waiting out a violent storm. Another British ship is mentioned, though no contact was made. The coastline from Cape Sable all the way to Margaret's Bay is represented by numerous illustrations. The weather seems to have been more favourable, and much of the area was apparently uncharted. This portion of the journey includes descriptions and illustrations of Cape Negro, Baye du Port Razor, Riv. des Jardins, Port Rosignol, Sable River, La Have Harbour, Mahone Bay (called here Mirligaich), Margaret's Bay, etc. The expedition continues from Margaret's Bay on to the Northeast, with observations of Cape Sambro, Riv. Chibouetou. Riv. Maganchis, Cape Thiodor, and it ends at St. Mary's River, on September 14, 1684. Appended to the journal is a twelve page "Inventaire pour servir a l'armament et consommation du nav(igation)," in which a very detailed list of hundreds of items is presented. The two categories that receive the most attention are boat fixtures (e.g., sails, bowsprites, halyards, stays, topsails, masts, anchors, rope, riggings, etc.) and armaments (e.g., cannons, ammunitions, guns, other weapons, etc.). Surgical equipment is briefly mentioned. Extraneous observations are also included from time to time: an abundance of fish off Cape Forcheau; arborage and foliage on shore; disembarkments, during one of which one of the crew apparently attempted to desert. MS-2-370, Oversize Folder 1
Isola di Capo Breton
Item · 1690
Item is a page from Coronelli's atlas, "Isolario Dell'Atlante Vento" featuring an engraving of 17th century Cape Breton Island. MAP 691
Carte de L'Isle Royale 1744
Item · 1744
Item is a hand-coloured map of Isle Royale (Cape Breton Island). Place names are in French as well as scale (Eschelles) and coordinate information. MAP 711
John Gorham
Fonds · 1748-1750
Consists of a single volume used as a waste or note book in which Gorham recorded, for the most part, financial transactions. In places the book displays some evidence that entries were later copied to ledger books recording the accounts of his ventures and pay of his men and many entries are about payments on accounts rather than direct cash transactions. The book covers activities during the period 1747 to 1750 and includes lists of expenses for recruiting, equipping and provisioning his company of rangers, lists of expenses for the upkeep and provisioning of several ships including the sloop Diligence and the schooners Warren and Anson. For the most part the volume documents the issuance of provisions and supplies to his men recording the distribution of food, clothing and to a lesser extent equipment and goods. Some entries record in the French language transactions with Acadians at Pizaquid (now Windsor, NS) for the provision of fresh meat and goods. Entries for wages paid, sometimes with the signed or marked receipts of his men appear throughout the book. The start of the book contains many entries related to his establishment on Sable Island, some entered retrospectively from 1747, and other island entries are scattered across the volume. Entries generally record where the activity was happening be it Annapolis Royal, Chebucto (now Halifax,NS), Minas or Boston (MA, USA). The volume also includes copies of a few letters. One in particular to a Mr Owles, speaks to the recruitment of rangers, the size of companies, some conditions of service and what happens in a peace. Also included in the volume is a crude manuscript map showing houses and names of some families, presumably along a portion of Cape Breton Island, NS – from Cape 'Shebnacada' (Shenacadie) which is a settlement located on the south end of St. Andrew’s Channel to past 'Grand Ance' (Grande Anse) which is on the north side of Lennox Passage. The volume ends with a description by Gorham in a two page entry of a skirmish with Mi'kmaq encountered by his sloop Diligence while sailing along the coastline in August of 1748 from 'Port Mahoan'(Mahone Bay) to 'Cape Porpicom'. (Portapique, Colchester County or Pubnico have been suggested as possible contemporary locations for "Porpicom".) 2013-014